biomedicalephemera:

Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.
In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.
Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.
Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

biomedicalephemera:

Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.

In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.

Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.

Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

biomedicalephemera:

Pedicle-type tissue transplantation

Shown in use for reconstruction of nasal tissues. This technique of transplanting tissue was particularly heavily used during and after the American Civil War, both Boer Wars, as well as after the Balkans Wars, where guns that were more accurate, but not more powerful, were very commonly used by both sides.

Today, its use is mostly limited to transplantation of highly-vascular thick dermal tissue to nearby structures, such as in complete nasal structure transplant and breast reconstruction surgery.

Operative Surgery of the Nose, Throat, and Ear. Hanau W. Loeb, 1917.

biomedicalephemera:

Upper: Lateral view of the permanent teethLower: Lateral view of the deciduous teeth [also known as milk teeth or baby teeth]
The permanent teeth consist of 32 teeth of four different types. There are 16 teeth on each jaw, and each jaw has 4 incisors, 2 canines, 4 premolars, and 6 molars (this includes the wisdom teeth, which are shown here)
The smaller mouth of the child only accommodates 20 teeth of three different types. There are 10 teeth on each jaw, and each jaw has 4 incisors, 2 canines, and 4 primary molars. 
Atlas and Text-Book of Dentistry. Gustav Preiswerk, translated by George W. Warren, 1906

biomedicalephemera:

Upper: Lateral view of the permanent teeth
Lower: Lateral view of the deciduous teeth [also known as milk teeth or baby teeth]

The permanent teeth consist of 32 teeth of four different types. There are 16 teeth on each jaw, and each jaw has 4 incisors, 2 canines, 4 premolars, and 6 molars (this includes the wisdom teeth, which are shown here)

The smaller mouth of the child only accommodates 20 teeth of three different types. There are 10 teeth on each jaw, and each jaw has 4 incisors, 2 canines, and 4 primary molars. 

Atlas and Text-Book of Dentistry. Gustav Preiswerk, translated by George W. Warren, 1906

Chase Britton, Born without a Cerebellum

Chase Britton, 3

Chase was also born prematurely, and he was legally blind. When he was 1 year old, doctors did an MRI, expecting to find he had a mild case of cerebral palsy. Instead, they discovered he was completely missing his cerebellum — the part of the brain that controls motor skills, balance and emotions.

"That’s when the doctor called and didn’t know what to say to us," Britton said in a telephone interview. "No one had ever seen it before. And then we’d go to the neurologists and they’d say, ‘That’s impossible.’ ‘He has the MRI of a vegetable,’ one of the doctors said to us."

Chase is not a vegetable, leaving doctors bewildered and experts 
rethinking what they thought they knew about the human brain.

He’s also missing his pons.